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>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
. and then sara. wondering what the relationship was between martha and either of george mason's wives? >> they were friendly neighbors know, they never became intimate friends. friendship was a political casualty. but after the constitutional onvention, which, of course, washington sanctioned and mason it spelled in , many ways an end to their friendship. twitter, george and martha washington, quite the power couple. we close out bringing us full circle, what are the important things for people to the influence of martha washington. >> i think it's important to powerful she and on and how dependent he was her. his achievements were his achievements. him aving her there with made them much more possible. >> i think that's true. defined influence in a way that perhaps contemporary have difficulty understanding. but the fact of the matter is, she was the most influential of the earth face with the president of the united states. this says richard norton of george graphy washington patriarch still available if you'd like to learn we've been talking about the book "martha ashington" with
mt. vernon love story by mary higgins clark. and she said that -- that no one ever called martha washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsie
of the early national government of the united states. >> last week in the martha washington program, we learned with great sorrow martha washington burned all of her papers, her letters, her correspondence with her husband george. only two of them remained. we have just the opposite here. thousands and thousands of them. explain the scope of the trove of materials that you have to work with as scholars through the writings of the adams family. >> the adams family gave to the massachusetts historical society a collection. we have never counted them individually, but probably 70,000+ documents over several generations, and probably about 300,000 pages. for abigail and john, which is the most important of the collection, there are about 1,170 letters they exchanged over the years. >> how frequently did they write to one another? >> it depended. when they were together -- for example, we do not have any letters after 1801 because after john leaves the white house, they're together almost all the time. for periods, for example, when there is fairly regular mail delivery between massachussett
, martha washington to angelica van buren. with tonight's all this month starting on monday at 9:00 eastern on c-span. on martha washington, joining the conversation with patricia brady at facebook.com. what's the british parliament is in recess for the month of august. a will return september 2. we take a look back at the major events debated over the last few months. the bc parliament produced a one-hour program. >> welcome to westminster in review. back at the big events since easter. coming up on this program, the chancellor said there are billions of pounds to come. sociale money for ever spending. >> britain will spend more at the percentage of its national income all caps on investment in this decade despite the act that in the previous decade spending was being wasted in industrial area what's the conservatives unite around referendum about our place in the european union and >> they deserve a say deserve to be given a real choice. to paraphrase, that which our forefathers equipped -- and bequeath. fax probably gets the go-ahead for gay couples to marry. -- >> gay couples get the go
martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side with james madison helping him. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the
first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, we focus on first lady eliza johnson. ♪ > she was close to being broken by the time she went to the white house. >> this is the earliest existing house. they lived here in the 1830's and 1840's. >> she was educated and taught school. >> she would work. the north and south fought all over the civil war. it changed hands 26 times. they did have domestic help. >> it was used as a hospital, it was used as a place to stay and it was destroyed. >> eliza wasn't able to get out much. >> she brought home many gifts. >> this is the room she returned to. >> she is obscure. she's who he needed. >> abraham lincoln's assassination weeks after his second inaugural shocked a war- ravaged nation. johnson's wife eliza was 54 years old when she was thrust into the role as first lady. he navigated the end of the civil war, reconstruction in the south and his own impeachment. this week on "first ladies, the life and times of eliza johnson." we learn more, let me introduce you to our two guests. jacqueline burger is in the midst of a biogra
in the martha washington program, we learned with great sorrow martha washington burned all of her papers, her letters, her correspondence with her husband george. only two of them remained. we have just the opposite here. thousands and thousands of them. explain the scope of the trove of materials that you have to work with as scholars through the writings of the adams family. >> the adams family gave to the massachusetts historical society a collection. we have never counted them individually, but probably 70,000+ documents over several generations, and probably about 300,000 pages. for abigail and john, which is the most important of the collection, there are about 1,170 letters they exchanged over the years. >> how frequently did they write to one another? >> it depended. when they were together -- for example, we do not have any letters after 1801 because after john leaves the white house, they're together almost all the time. for periods, for example, when there is fairly regular mail delivery between massachussetts and philadelphia, or later washington, d.c., they wrote at least once a
the parallels among them, how they handle things. >> i think in our first segment about martha washington, you saw martha as the person who protected the aspect of the role, the social partners to the president, and a hope to the nation. when you get to abigail, she becomes a political partner with her husband and pioneers that role. dolley is the one that brings the two of them together. she becomes the social and political partner for her husband. i think that sets all kinds of precedents for the future first lady. she is still held up as a standard by which other people measure themselves today. >> we will spend the first 35 minutes on those important white house years. it was such an interesting time for the country and we want to make sure you understand the history of it. we will learn how this young quaker woman became an internationally known first lady and we will end up with her legacy. we welcome your participation. throughout the program, we will have phone lines open. you can send us a tweet and use #firstladies. there are people wanting to know about martha jefferson. they are th
first segment about martha washington, you saw martha as the person who protected the aspect of the role, which was the social partner to the president, and hostess for the nation. then when you get to abigail, she becomes a political partner with her husband and pioneers that role. dolley is the one that brings the two of them together. she becomes the social and political partner for her husband. i think that sets all kinds of precedents for the future first lady. she is kind of, still, held up as a standard by which people measure themselves today. >> we will spend the first 35 minutes on those important white house years. it was such an interesting time for the country and we want to make sure you understand the history of it. later on we will go back in time and learn about her biography, how this young quaker woman became an internationally known first lady and we will end up with her legacy. that's what tonight looks like. we welcome your participation. throughout the program, we will have phone lines open. you can send us a tweet and use #firstladies. and we have a c-span page on
at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i thinkth
martha washington's slave. out in 1796,ound that martha washington was planning to give her away. during the planning, slaves were away. this was upsetting, because the washington's had promised to free their slaves when they died. and she was going to be given away, that meant that she was going to be in slavery. she may plan to escape. she talks about this later, one whenng, in 1796, washington was sitting at the dinner table, literally, waiting for them to serve him, she escaped. she -- george decides that they are going to kidnap her. that was fairly common. >> how many stories are there like this? >> many. there were always african americans in the white house. james buchanan's administration. were upset.ners he dismissed the african- american staff and brought in irish and english house servants. that is the only time that happened. left the hercules, washington compound and was never found again. they think he was in new york. they do not know. not a lot of effort was made to find him. hise is trouble about slaves and hers. he freed his and he did not free hers. i do not know the
series, first ladies, influence and image. next week, martha washington to angelica van buren. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> senator mark pryor is joining us this week on "the communicators." your full committee recently approved tom wheeler to the sec. senator cruz,, has talked about putting a hold on that nomination. any word on that right now? >> we are working on that. the may 1 say, thank you for having me on. people in arkansas to watch c- span lot, i want to thank c-span for what they do. back to the tom wheeler nomination, basically there is sentiment within the senate that we ought to repair this with the republican nominee. have acans would like to republican to go alongside the process. the problem is the we have not thecially released republican name that they want nominated. hopefully we will get this done quickly and senator rockefeller has said this publicly that he wanted to expedite that. my view is that you do not have to pare them. it ink that if we can do such a way that
at the life of edith roosevelt. encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha
on every first lady from arthur working to and. tonight, -- martha washington. tonight we focus on frances cleveland. >> frances cleveland was a celebrity first later unlike any before her.and the mass production of her image to sell a bride of goods by the consumer industry angered her and her
he will have before heading off for vacation to martha's vineyard. live here for you on c-span. your thoughts and questions he would ask the president. this is lynn in seattle. caller: hello. i just want to say that, i want to make a comment, first i would -- i would ask that everyone is talking about how the government is looking at us and watching us, if you're doing it, and you're not doing anything wrong, don't worry about it. ist america should realize that the boston bombing, it wasn't for those cameras, those guys would still be at large. possibly. i would ask the president about the healthcare saying. as a previous caller stated, notle are what we are because of our faults, because of social souls -- social stratification. some people need health care. i just graduated from a community college. i do not have a job. host: what is your degree in? appliedit is associated sciences, and i have a chemical dependency practitioner training. host: weber july to work? caller: i would like to work at the white house. to be honest with you. host: as an advisor? caller: as that, and is a
tonight at 6:30 p.m. eastern time right here on c-span. president obama's occasion in martha possible inured is ending today. -- in martha's vineyard is ending tonight. be talking about his proposals for helping the middle class. representative jim hems erlang, he is the chairman of the -- jeb hensarling. he was a keynote speaker at the policy center. he this is about 40 minutes. [applause] >> thank you mr. secretary for the kind introduction. i don't know if you can see me, this is a rather large podium. it reminds me of what i frequently tell my washington colleagues -- everything is bigger in texas but me. if you can't see me, you can at least hear me. i was delighted to accept the invitation to speak before the bipartisan policy center for a couple of reasons. number one is because of the outstanding work you have done in the housing arena and number two, i live about re-miles from here so it took me about seven minutes to get here. as a fairly new chairman of a standing committee of congress, i have a number of speaking invitations that come my way. a lot of press is interested i
and recess. the president is doing his weeklong vacation at mothers -- at martha's vineyard. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a demo stretch and in cairo to protest the death toll yesterday. now at 421. another 3500 were injured. 43 policemen and a western journalist among those killed. it is thursday morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from th
of blacks in the white house. >> yes. >> this is a q&a for a couple of years ago about the martha washington's slave -- pick it up at the end. >> she found out early 1796 that martha washington was planning to give her away as a wedding gift. during slavery, slaves were given away. this was upsetting for her. because when they died, they would free individuals who were slave to them. and she had hoped down the road she would be out of the institution. but if she's going to be given away, that meant her whole life was going to be in slavery. she's going make plans to escape. she writes, she talks about later, one evening, late spring, 1796 while the washingtons were silting at the dinner table waiting for her to serve them, she went out the back door. rather than say, you know, she escaped, we don't like it, but we'll leave it alone. george decides to kidnap her. they send a nephew back to kidnap her which was actually fairly common. >> how many stories in history like this, slaves in the white house? >> many stories. there were african-americans in the white house, except the james buchanan
here on c-span. vacation tong for martha's vineyard, president obama traveled to orlando, florida, to does -- to discuss the disabled veterans national convention. talk about the priorities of his and administration, including any the backlog, incentive, and the creation of a initiative. he also called on congress to make tax credits permanent for businesses that hire veterans, and two passes veterans job or proposal. knowank you all, please, i you have been working hard, so rest yourselves. [laughter] i am beyond thrilled to be here with all of you today, and i want to start by thanking larry for that very kind introduction, but more importantly for his tremendous leadership of the dav and for all of his outstanding service to this country. but most of all, i want to thank all of you here today. the men and women who have served and sacrificed so greatly on behalf of all americans. truly, one of my greatest joys over these past few years has been spending time with veterans and military families like all of you. i have laughed with your children at barbecues, i have gone to baby
fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support system that enables him to volunteer his time and talents to run the revolution is clearly critical. first, a farm manager, who during most literal revolution is a distant cousin of washington. \washington. then
, a continuing resolution to fund the government expiring -- martha, i'm wondering if you can talk about what the obama administration is proposing in early childhood, what the administration is wanting to see , and maybe how they are working to get congress to take up these issues when it is hard to get funding bills going at this point. >> one thing to be clear -- the cuts in headstart and sequestration in general were very much not the administration's plan. you're very much trying to put ourselves on a path to reverse that. moreover, our plan for early education is very much one of investment. investment in head start, not only making sure that programs can keep up with the cost of inflation and not have to make choices that were described, but also to build out a new early head start childcare partnership so some of the best things about head start can be brought to the broader childcare subsidy system and we can raise the quality of early childhood for those infants and toddlers. we have proposed a large investment in home visiting, which is in place right now, but the money is temporar
folks on the map. it is the equivalent of martha washington wearing homespun. my new book is called "affairs of state turco -- state." frances cleveland was a jackie kennedy figure. they wanted mrs. cleveland's clothing. she said that she would not wear a restrictive thing. that ended the core set -- corset. nancy reagan was more than lipstick and high heels. the media portrayed her monolithically. there's is more to her fashion sense. -- there is more to her fashion sense. michelle may be a fashionable woman but, she is a ivy league attorney. she has had all. she is the image of the american woman. we look at first ladies for that. and i say, thank goodness. i would rather have them look at first ladies then lindsay lohan. their influence is hard to measure. mamie, the bangs were an influence. they would ask her about her politics and she would say, i flip pork chops. it was a cutesy and fulks see kind of way of disarming it -- folksy kind of way of disarming it. the first lady does not have a bullet -- a bully pulpit, but a velvet glove. >> madison avenue does presidential ads wit
and private lives of our nation's first ladies. week, martha washington to angelica van buren. ladies, weeknights all this month starting monday, 9:00 and eastern on c-span monday's program on martha washington, join in the onversation with historian and author patricia brady at facebook.com/c-span. >> this week on "q&a," presidential historian and seale discusses first ladies, influence and image. >> bill seale, who has the having on in history as kept the best of the white house. >> kept as a place to live, as a residence? > you know, well groomed and all that? -- yeah, i would say
clinton always go to martha's vineyard? priceey paying a proper for the houses they rent? these issues of been explored in every administration i have seen in washington since the 1980's. >> we will take one or two more calls, and then wrap things up with our guest. these -- caller: lobbyists, i think they ought to be outlawed. is just bribery, if you think about it. it is just bribery, paying off the politicians, putting money in their pockets for what their goal is, not the people's goal. that is what i have to say. host: is there any aspect of this we have not talked about that you want to bring up, anything else we should know? guest: not really. i think it has been good to hear the opinions of people in the real world about this, and about the presidential stuff. it gives us something to think about. guest: maybe it is something we can think about. the reuters washington bureau chief. thank you for your time. >> we take you live now to dublin, new hampshire. this is a fundraiser with texas senator ted cruz, one of the candidates we might see run for president in 2016. the chair of
are away and president obama is on his vacation at martha's vineyard. morning, about the domestic front and battles in washington, to hear from "the wall street journal" -- that happening in washington too as members of congress are on this august recess. by the way, we are going to be covering over this month town hall meetings that are happening in your area. today atwe are airing 6:30 this evening pm eastern time is a town hall meeting in richmond, virginia with congressman bobby scott, democrat of that area. tune into c-span. live coverage of that town hall meeting. i'm sure these issues are likely to come up. he meets with constituents. let's hear from john and pensacola, florida. you are on the air. john and pensacola? westmoving onto joe and hartford, connecticut. an independent. caller: how are you? thank you for c-span. when i heard the topic, i wondered if holder had read a book by michelle alexander. hello? host: we are listening. the name of the book is called "the new jim crow." if you look in the c-span archives, i think you have done an interview with her. she is a profes
with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not know the full answers. it would make for interesting inquiry by rick or any other journalist. carolyn "--s carolyn's story about africa goes, it is stunning. for the costunning of journalists who have to travel wi
gathering at martha's vineyard in massachusetts and we'll have audio of the president's comments coming up at about 10:15 eastern time on c-span television and c-span radio. and the video will be fed in later this morning. we'll have that as well. we'll also post it on our website at c spafment.org. the death toll, more than 500 killed yesterday. 3,500 injured. diana is joining us from warren, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: good morning. i just want to say that this really breaks my heart to hear of this. no one can win. if one person ever dies. it can never be of any been fit to anyone -- benefit to anyone if somebody else dies. trust in money -- you can't buy trust. you can't give money to buy their trust. people feel a better sense of accomplishment when it's earned. everybody wants to be the chief. nobody wants to be the indian. here you have people over there don't mind staying there, they don't want to move over here, and yet everything that they worked so hard for many a years to build is being destroyed. that breaks my heart. that really breaks my heart. i
. programs on every first lady from martha washington wine mckinley. tonight, harriet lane. quite she is probably the most tragic of all the first ladies. she hated it with a passion. she did not move into the white house with peace. >> they had eight rooms they had to furnish. when she arrived, she basically holed up and spent much of her time writing letters to her dead son. she called them my presaged child. a very poignant letter. , andey were returning there was a terrible accident. . it was devastating for the family. god.she concluded this was forhe house was too much jane to take care of. i don't think she was interested in housekeeping particularly. >> most regarded peer us as a failure in the office. >> it was the happiest of all presidencies. >> good evening. on this program, we learned about the final first ladies of the antebellum era. whose tenurepierce was defined by overwhelming loss. the time she and her husband are brought to the executive mansion, they have lost all fore of their young sons the next 45 minutes, we will .elve into jane pierce good evening. welcome. >
is vacationing in martha's vineyard. here is part of those remarks. >> that is why we are so concerned by reason -- recent events. we appreciate the complexity of the situation. mohamed morsi was elected president in a democratic election him and his government was not conclusive and did not respect the views of all egyptians. egyptians wereny calling for a change in course. we do not believe force is the way to resolve political differences, after the military's intervention several weeks ago, there remained a chance for reconciliation and an opportunity to pursue a democratic path. instead, we have seen a more dangerous path taken. arbitrary arrests, a broad crackdown on mohamed morsi's associations and supporters, and now tragically, violence has taken the lives of hundreds of people and wounded thousands. the united states strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by egypt's interim government and security forces. we deplorable violence against civilians. we support universal rights to human dignity, including the right to peaceful protest. we oppose the pursuit of martial law. it den
-- programs of every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, mary todd lincoln. [captioning performed bynational captioning institute] [captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013] ♪ >> born in 1818 in lexington, kentucky, mary todd grew up and lived to see her husband issued the emancipation proclamation 45 years later. a mother of four sons, she witnessed the death of three of those sons as well as her husband's assassination. her life was filled with tragedy, but as lincoln's political partner, she relished we focus onss.as the civil war years, one of the defining moments in our countries history, a look at the life and times of mary todd lincoln, one of the most complex first ladies ever to live. thank you for being with us for c-span's serious. we invite two of our academic advisors. our guests for this program. rosalyn penn is a history professor at meredith and morgan richard nortonty. smith, our other guest tonight, the director of five presidential libraries, including the abraham lincoln library in springfield, illinois. thanks to both of y
job training. they are stopping in orlando on their way to martha's vineyard where they have vacationed a before.f times there will be no official -- appearance is what he is on vacation. he will be returning to washington august 18. he vacationed at the vineyard before, 2009, 2010, and 2011. this time, staying in a new location near public roads, so the road will be closed. later tonight, remarks by state davis ineend -- wendy texas as well at her filibuster as a texas -- of a texas abortion bill. >> many of you heard my name for the first time last month when, as allison said, in the last hours of the texas legislative session, the partisans and power attempted to pass not just an abortion bill, but a bill that would block health care access to tens of thousands of women across the state of texas. in the process, these partisan lawmakers were seeking to rob texas women of their voice. because when women showed up at to testify, and they showed up by the thousands, many of them were turned away. and they were unable to give voice to an issue that had a very real impact on th
tonight p.m. eastern, and during tonight's program on martha washington, join in the onversation with the author, patricia brady at facebook.com/c-span. c-span, we bring public affairs to washington putting the room, in hearings and riefings and conferences, and offering complete gavel-to-gavel overage in the u.s. house, provided by the industry by funded by your local satellite provider, and now you us in h-d. >> before tonight's u.s. senate in new jersey, a look at press club, hosting senator, wendy davis, she's the hosted a 10-hour abortion, talking bout politics in texas and her own political future. [gavel] and welcome noon, i ame national press club, keane, president of the ational press club, for more information about the national press club, please visit our www.press.org, to to te to programs offered the public, please visit press.org/institute. of our members world wi wide, i would like to welcome you and if you hear applause in audience. members of the general public is visiting, and would like to welcome our c-span and public radio audiences. available on are podcast
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
made on martha's vineyard. here is the headline. they say it shows the limits of u.s. sway, writing a rebuke underscored the limits of u.s. influence with the nation's generals, who benefit 1.3 billion dollars a year in military aid. in addition to canceling the high-profile military exercise scheduled to begin next month, obama said his national security team will consider further steps as necessary, a comment that puts military aid in question. we will show you the president's comments next from martha's vineyard and then back to your comments and calls. >> good morning, everybody. i just finished a discussion with my national security team about the situation in egypt. i wanted to provide an up eight. -- an update. let me get by stepping back. the relationship between the united states and egypt goes back decades. it's rooted in our respect of egypt as a nation, ancient center of civilization, and cornerstone for peace in the middle east. it's also rooted in our ties to the egyptian people forged through a long-standing partnership. just over two years ago america was inspired by
, the night. we feature programs on every first lady from martha washington. today, julia grant. host: serving as first lady from 1869 to 1877, julia grant relished the role. she once commented that life inside the white house was a garden spot of orchids. growing up in a slaveholding family, she ended up as wife of the commanding u.s. general during the civil war. she and ulysses s. grant shared 37 years together that included the hardships of war, the challenges of politics, and eight years in the white house. welcome to our program, "first ladies: influence and image." tonight, julia grant. let me introduce you to our guests. bill seale is a member of our series. he is a longtime white house historian and the author of "the president's house." pam sanfilippo is a historian at the ulysses s. grant national historic site. she is also working on a biography of julia grant. i want to start with you. we last left the series with the johnsons after impeachment and the politics with the radical republicans in reconstruction in the south. set the stage for us as the grants come into the white house
entations one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. programs on span, every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. e're offering the special edition of the book, "first ladies of the united states of america" presenting the of each and portrait first lady, comments from noted historians and thoughts from the role of a on first ladies throughout history. now available for the discounted of $12.95 plus shipping at c-span.organize/products. the website has more about first lady, including a special white , "welcome to the house" produced by our partner, the white house historical association. in the icles life executive mansion during the tenure of each of the first ladies. more at c-span.organize/first ladies. >> c-span. e bring public affairs events from washington directly to you putting you in the room at white sional hearings, house events, briefings, and onferences and offering complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house all a public private industry where c-span created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago by the local cable or satellite provider. hd. ou can watch this in >>
of the images. martha was harder but we know the portrait is probably the best there is. i relied on that one. the rest were in photography, lots of photography. with all of that information, i pieced together images that i thought were good and representative. >> what is the process you go through when starting to work on a painting? how much work goes into the project before you start to paint? >> well, first i'll do the research and background and things like that of a normal portrait of someone i need to represent and almost life size and 3-d and sculpting too. i need to get to know them. i'm using it for a relatively small portrait. but a lot of the work happens first. the research and gathering and sketching. and what i started with is as a kid is pencil work. this is right on the board to make it easier for me. i draw on the board with pencil and keep going and going until i like it. getting the scale right, all of those things, and then progress from there. >> so how long did you work on this painting and that's from research through the painting process. even break it up if you have
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
of season one. each weekday, at 9:00 p.m., programs from martha washington to ida mckinley. margaret taylor and abigail fillmore. >> sarah polk was up on diplomacy and intelligence. she made no bones about having an interest in politics and being her husband's partner. she group in a political household. she grew up loving politics and she married james after he won a seat in the legislature will stop he not does she would not have mailing -- legislature. she would not have married him otherwise will stop -- otherwise. >> throughout their long and illustrious political career. she lived there many years. generals on both sides would pay their respects. it is an interesting commentary on what beloved status she held. >> she was honest about her husband's work. she went to every post she could go to with him. she went through the arduous journey. she was very well-liked in the diplomatic community. they met all kinds of people. friends and enemies and others. they had to make things work. they were very experienced people. they were more sophisticated than what is around them. >> she felt tha
of the first ladies evolved from martha washington until this day? it sounds like there are a lot of similarities, really. it depends on the individual first lady as to how. >> it is. actually, i think that the first three first ladies -- martha, abigail, and dolly -- were far harder working and more actively involved in their husband's lives and in their careers. and my own opinion was that when we stopped being colonies and started being a country, maybe by the 1800's or so, that generation growing up, we were growing to be more -- they were more prominent. they were very prosperous. men wanted their wives to have all sorts of lovely things. they catered to them a lot more. they didn't have to work quite as hard. ladies at that time, they started, i guess being frailer. >> 1857 the key supreme court -- the dred scott supreme court decision on slavery. in 1858, the lecompton constitution. in 1860, the pony express was established. and in 1861, the creation of the confederate states of america. this white house was dealing with enormous problems but not very effectively. how did t
's happening in egypt. the president return from the martha's vineyard. the question we're asking what makes americans so angry and divided from dallas, texas. caller: well, i think the economy is the biggest issue here. people don't have jobs. if they do have jobs they are working two or three of them just to support their families. it started back with regan, his deregulation then clinton and nafta and the undermining of glass speegal which is done as a suggestion of robert, ruben and larry summers whom obama was to bring back into government again, as part of the fed, and i think the economy is a very difficult subject. and neither bush nor obama has had the knowledge or the decisiveness to deal with it. under bush it got worse and worse and then when paulson ame one his bailout crisis soverl, he bailed out big banks. the economy has been attacking the average american citizen for the past 20 years, we just didn't notice it until it became really horrific and then of course the wars that have cost us a fortune. that was done -- so many of these things come from theorists within the govern
:00 eastern on c-span, programs on every first lady from martha washington on. . night, lucie hayes >> it is so unfair to her. it is a dismissive, condescending title. it suggests she is smooth talking and her function in life was to not serve alcohol. lucy hayes is so much more. as was her husband. everything she accomplished in the white house was in spite of the fact her husband's legitimacy to be president was questioned. >> she was a charming person, very delightful. nnovative. >> one of the more controversial collections is the white house china. an article says the art was absurd. who would want to eat a lovely meal and see a duck at the bottom of their plate? >> she took an interest in public affairs from an early age. >> two causes that were important to her were veterans and soldiers and orphans, children who had been made orphans as a result of the civil war. >> she was a very devout mother. she does not neglect her children. she embraces the life. >> lucie hayes said women's binds were as strong as man's. she was the first first lady to earn a college degree. that tells
. present herself? the dais and -- > they built it to the blue room. we were here for martha, i said here was no dais in the receiving room. she sat on a sofa. been so d have anti-republican. angelica didn't know better. and francen victoria and she thought she could be platform,he built the wore the ostrich feathers and in white. after the newspapers and particularly after the whig talking ns took over about born with golden spoons in their mouths and wasting the they actually tore out the platform. well flipside of it, how did the europeans receive the first couple? allow. liked her a >> louis felipe thought she was incredible. storm.ook europe by >> did that help with international politics? the image? not exactly. ngelica's mother's brother was the minister of the court of 126789 james. a holdover from that administration. van buren kept him on. stuff because he was a slave breeder by an irish militant. growing tension there. on he publicity of angelica the positive side didn't really cover up those deeper problems. > tonight we're telling the story of two widowed presidents for them
to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area. how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not know the full answers. it would make for interesting inquiry by rick or any other journalist. it is just as carolyn's story about africa goes, i
's program on martha washington, join in the conversation. ive-ek recess.f-town f returning after labor day. now that congress is on summer break, what do you want to hear from your lawmakers as they travel back to their respective congressional district or state? the numbers are on your screen. cq focusing on the issue of immigration. mindful of how immigration opponents in august 2006 seized momentum. lawmakers also focusing on the voting rights act. patrick leahy is the chair of the senate judiciary committee and brought up the issue of the voting rights act following the supreme court decision earlier this year. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> president obama had an emotional news conference with the victims of the newtown shooting and he said this was just round one. with the election coming up, is it realistic to expect round two on that? >> it is mentioned it is something that but is notsense, something that he will get to now. unfortunate. could you pass one law that would stop all the gun violence in this country? no. but can you do better than we have? yes. you have so
. this week, martha washington to angelica van buren. starting at 9 p.m. eastern on c- span. program, join's in on the conversation with historian and author patricia rady at facebook.com/cspan. >> i have been pushing for this in the senate, that we would move cybersecurity legislation. it is bacon cop located. cybersecurity means different things to different people. -- it is big and complicated. cybersecurity means different things to different people. the house is actually passed some of this and i think we ought to look at what they have done. certainly if we want to take a stab at doing are only thing in the senate, that is great. but we need to really get moving on this in the senate. this is a real threat, a real problem him and all of my colleagues are on the intelligence committee and are worried about cybersecurity. internetlogy and issues on capitol hill, tonight on "the communicators on co. at eight eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: last week the fbi announced a major operation targeting child prostitution efforts in 76 cities. michael harpster joins
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